Automotive

Tribological research has been embraced for many years in the automotive industry and PCS' range of instruments are used around the world to design and develop world leading formulations for the field.

Whether you are focused on motorbikes or lorries, on electric vehicles or petrol, in every automotive application you will find moving parts; and where you find these moving parts you find tribology. From gearboxes to brake pads our instruments have been used to drive the innovation of the automotive sector through reliable, repeatable bench top testing.

In the automotive industry the benefits of tribological research are widespread. One major benefit from the continued research and improvement of lubricant and coating formulations is the protection they offer moving parts in automotive systems. This improved protection means increased reliability, which is great for customers but also for the environment as parts need replacing less frequently.

Environmental benefits of tribological research in the automotive sector are also found in the improvement in efficiency of powertrain systems, the result of better lubricants. With estimates suggesting that 200,000 million litres of fuel are used annually to overcome friction in passenger cars, even a modest 0.1% improvement in efficiency could result in hundreds of millions of litres of fuel being saved.

Using PCS equipment, testing of contacts under conditions found in internal combustion engines can be performed, shear rates can be replicated and EHD film thicknesses can be analysed. PCS have worked closely with a large number of experts in the automotive industry for the past 30 years, and our instruments have developed to meet their ever-changing needs.

Automotive industry research areas include:

  • CV joints
  • Cam follower systems
  • Bearings
  • Gearboxes
  • Brake pads
  • Clutch pads
  • Diesel fuels

Automotive Industry includes the following:

Cars

Cars

Many aspects of cars are tribologically interesting. Extensive research into a host of components such as gearboxes, engines, bearings and brakes is ongoing around the world.

Heavy Duty Vehicles

Heavy Duty Vehicles

Like with cars, tribology research into heavy duty vehicles is ongoing and for this area higher loads are often focused on for more representative test conditions.

Motorcycles

Motorcycles

Motorcycles typically run at higher RPM than cars and heavy duty vehicles. This places different requirements on the oils and lubricants used in them, which is an area of focused research.

Motorsport

Motorsport

Tribology is even more important in motor sport than in consumer cars. The tolerances are finer and the optimisation of fuels and lubricants greater, so how surfaces interact is critical in developing the fastest racer possible.

Instruments for the Automotive Industry

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Automotive Industry Articles & Papers

Paper

Lubricating Oil Composition

The present invention relates to a lubricating oil composition containing a base oil (A), a molybdenum dithiocarbamate (B), an ester-based …

The present invention relates to a lubricating oil composition containing a base oil (A), a molybdenum dithiocarbamate (B), an ester-based ashless friction modifier (C), and a metal salicylate (D), wherein the content of a molybdenum atom derived from the molybdenum dithiocarbamate (B) is 650 ppm by mass or more on the basis of the whole amount of the lubricating oil composition; a content ratio [C/BMo] of the ester-based ashless friction modifier (C) to a molybdenum atom derived from the molybdenum dithiocarbamate (B) is 5.0 to 10 in terms of a mass ratio; the content of a salicylate soap group derived from the metal salicylate (D) is 0.50% by mass or more on the basis of the whole amount of the lubricating oil composition; and a kinematic viscosity at 100° C. is 4.0 mm2/s or more and less than 9.3 mm2/s, and a high-temperature high-shear viscosity at 150° C. is 1.7 mPa·s or more and less than 2.9 mPa·s. In accordance with the present invention, a viscosity-reduced lubricating oil composition in which nonetheless a molybdenum dithiocarbamate and an ashless friction modifier are jointly used, not only friction can be reduced early after commencement of lubrication, but also such a state can be maintained, is provided.

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Paper

Influence of Wear Surface Morphology and Phosphorus-Containing Tribofilm on Crack Initiation of Manganese Phosphate Coated Steel under Rolling–Sliding Contact

To improve the rolling–sliding contact fatigue strength of a case-carburized steel, the effect of the wear surface morphologies of manganese …

To improve the rolling–sliding contact fatigue strength of a case-carburized steel, the effect of the wear surface morphologies of manganese phosphate (MnP) coated steel and the growth and removal of phosphorus-containing tribofilm on surface-initiated crack formation was investigated. In order to modify the wear surface morphologies, two types of surface textures (ground and shot blasted) were prepared, followed by the MnP coating process. The tribological properties of the coated steel, tribofilm growth and removal, and surface-initiated crack formation were evaluated using a ball-on-disk tribometer with a rolling–sliding mode. The MnP coating on both the ground and shot blasted steel had nearly the same thickness and surface roughness. However, for the ground surface sample, the interface morphology between the coating and steel substrate was more irregular than the shot blasted surface sample, resulting in a larger number of exposed steel areas with smaller sizes after the MnP was almost worn away on tribological tests. During the running-in period, phosphorus-containing tribofilm growth and removal on the smaller exposed steel areas were observed. The surface-initiated crack formation on the smaller exposed steel areas was suppressed compared with larger exposed steel areas.

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