Food and Beverage

By quantifying sensory perception, we are aiding the development of healthier, lower cost foods with the same ‘mouth feel’ as market leading products.

‘Creamy’, ‘sugary’ and ‘slimy’ are all adjectives commonly used to describe foods during consumer panel testing. By linking these adjectives to physical, measurable properties of a sample, analysis can be performed to screen numerous new formulations without the expense and ambiguity of panel tests, saving companies both time and money.

Using our instruments, researchers have discovered that the frictional properties of our favourite foods are related to their fat and sugar content (i.e. the higher the fat content the lower the friction coefficient, hence the creamier the taste).

Food and Beverage industry research areas include:

  • Reduced fat dairy products such as yoghurt, cream, mayonnaise and chocolate.
  • Astringency of wine, green/black tea and fruit.
  • Carbonated vs non-carbonated beverages.
  • Reduced sugar content of beverages.
  • Mouthfeel of foods and its impact on enjoyment and satiation.

Food and Beverage Industry includes the following:

Beverage

Beverage

Not just the taste but also the feel of a drink will change how enjoyable it is to drink. This has been investigated for everything from wines to soft drinks.

Food

Food

A key aspect of enjoying food is its mouthfeel. Studies have looked at a range of food groups such as dairy foods and their creaminess, and the smoothness of baby foods.

Pet Care

Pet Care

Pet food isn't just for nutrition but can also serve to clean their teeth. Research into this field is ongoing, in what is a rapidly growing market.

Instruments for the Food and Beverage Industry

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Food and Beverage Industry Articles & Papers

Paper

3D Enabled Facile Fabrication of Substrates With Human Tongue Characteristics for Analysing the Tribological Behaviour of Food Emulsions

The mouth-feel or oral perception of a food may vary in different oral surfaces or tongue-palate environment depending on the …

The mouth-feel or oral perception of a food may vary in different oral surfaces or tongue-palate environment depending on the physical characteristics of human tongue. Tribological measurements emulating the characteristics of tongue-palate environment will assist in the evaluation of oral perception of food materials. This study reports a 3D printing assisted approach for rapid fabrication of the soft elastomer substrates with different surface (roughness) and bulk characteristics (elastic modulus and thickness) for tribological measurements. The influence of substrates with various regularly patterned surfaces, elastic modulus, and thickness on the lubrication properties of four food emulsions (full-fat and skim milk, high-fat and low-fat yoghurt) has been investigated. It is observed that friction coefficient of food emulsions increases with a decrease in height or an increase in density of rectangular micro-scale pillars representing papillae on the surface of soft substrate. Interestingly, a decrease in the elastic modulus of the substrates causes an increase in the friction coefficient for the milk samples, whereas for yoghurt samples it causes a decrease. The variations in the thickness of the substrates have little effect on the friction coefficients of the food emulsions.

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Paper

Tribological and Sensory Properties

Eating, functionalized by mouth physiology, is performed through a series of processes which collectively helps in food ingestion, preparing the …

Eating, functionalized by mouth physiology, is performed through a series of processes which collectively helps in food ingestion, preparing the food for swallowing, ab-initio digestion, and food sensory perceptions. Sensory properties of food are typically defined by its texture, flavor, and color. Unlike flavor and color, characterizing texture perceptions remain a daunting task because of variegated in-mouth breakdown mechanisms of food depending on several influencing factors. Therefore, it always remains a persisting challenge to correlate instrumental outputs with texture perception. Over the recent decade, principles of tribology—the subject of friction, wear, and lubrication––have been recognized in food sensory research in order to adopt novel instrumental approaches for texture perceptions. This idea of incorporating tribological principles stems from the availability of friction that arises while the tongue manipulates food over the palate during oral processing. Eventually, the terminology such as oral tribology has been introduced, and the subject is rapidly gaining maturity for food sensory applications especially to demonstrate some highly specific sensory descriptions and to define a quantifiable metric for those sensory descriptions. This chapter will revisit the various principles and applications of tribology in pertinence to texture characteristics of food in general and edible hydrocolloids in particular while attempting to identify potential research gaps and future research scopes.

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