Food & Beverage

By quantifying sensory perception, we are aiding the development of healthier, lower cost foods with the same ‘mouth feel’ as market leading products.

‘Creamy’, ‘sugary’ and ‘slimy’ are all adjectives commonly used to describe foods during consumer panel testing. By linking these adjectives to physical, measurable properties of a sample, analysis can be performed to screen numerous new formulations without the expense and ambiguity of panel tests, saving companies both time and money.

Using our instruments, researchers have discovered that the frictional properties of our favourite foods are related to their fat and sugar content (i.e. the higher the fat content the lower the friction coefficient, hence the creamier the taste).

Food and Beverage industry research areas include:

  • Reduced fat dairy products such as yoghurt, cream, mayonnaise and chocolate.
  • Astringency of wine, green/black tea and fruit.
  • Carbonated vs non-carbonated beverages.
  • Reduced sugar content of beverages.
  • Mouthfeel of foods and its impact on enjoyment and satiation.

Food & Beverage Industry includes the following:

Beverage

Beverage

Not just the taste but also the feel of a drink will change how enjoyable it is to drink. This has been investigated for everything from wines to soft drinks.

Food

Food

A key aspect of enjoying food is its mouthfeel. Studies have looked at a range of food groups such as dairy foods and their creaminess, and the smoothness of baby foods.

Pet Care

Pet Care

Pet food isn't just for nutrition but can also serve to clean their teeth. Research into this field is ongoing, in what is a rapidly growing market.

Instruments for the Food & Beverage Industry

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Food & Beverage Industry Articles & Papers

Paper

Tribological Method to Measure Lubricating Properties of Dairy Products

Tribology has a growing interest in oral texture and sensory research due to its ability to assess certain properties of …

Tribology has a growing interest in oral texture and sensory research due to its ability to assess certain properties of the food during the complex oral processing that cannot be explained by its bulk texture and rheology. Developing a reliable, low cost and easy-to-use tribometer applicable to a wide variety of food products is still a big challenge to researchers. In this work, a simple method to measure lubricating properties (friction coefficient) of dairy products is presented using a newly introduced tribometer coupled with a widely used rheometer. Pasteurized milks (fat contents from 0.1% to 4.9%) and cream cheeses (fats content: 0.5%, 5.5%, 11.6%) were chosen as representative dairy products and their friction coefficients were measured as a function of entrainment speed of the tribometer. The friction coefficients of the samples at low entrainment speed generating low shear rate (similar to the shear rate in mouth) were significantly different between the samples at each fat levels. Thus, this method is capable of differentiating samples with different fat contents both in liquid or semi-solid forms. This suggests a promising application of this technique for a quick assessment of the sensory mouthfeel of various dairy products in relation to fat content.

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Paper

Mouthfeel Blends for Low and Non-caloric Beverages

The present disclosure provides a composition for improving mouthfeel of beverages, comprising: a hydrolyzed beta-glucan characterized by an average molecular …

The present disclosure provides a composition for improving mouthfeel of beverages, comprising: a hydrolyzed beta-glucan characterized by an average molecular weight (Mw) of about 50,000 to 350,000; and a hydrolyzed arabinoxylan, characterized by an average molecular weight (Mw) of about 50,000 to about 350,000. Also provided are methods of improving the mouthfeel of a beverage product by adding to it a composition of the disclosure.

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